What do these people have in common?

  • A 40-year old reporter loses his ability to write, falls when he attempts to walk, and becomes so confused that his wife suspects early-onset Alzheimer’s … 
  • A beautiful, normal eight-month-old baby gradually loses her speech, stops responding to her parents and eventually can’t even sit up by herself … 
  • A 20-year-old woman becomes severely depressed and attempts to kill herself … 
  • A ballet dancer undergoes cosmetic surgery and ends up nearly unable to walk … 
  • A 69-year-old woman develops balance problems, falls and fractures her hip … 
  • A 38-year-old woman condemned to life in a wheelchair after gastric bypass surgery … 
  • An 86-year-old man becomes delusional and kills his wife … 
  • A 54-year-old woman experiences paranoid delusions and violent outbursts, coupled with symptoms her doctor diagnoses as multiple sclerosis … 
  • A 4-year-old boy is diagnosed with autism … 
  • A 73-year-old whose doctors attribute his repeated falls to old age or possible “mini-strokes” … 
  • A young woman unable to conceive … 
  • A grandfather transforms, in less than a year, from a healthy jogger to a depressed, confused man diagnosed with senile dementia.

 

Here’s what these patients don’t have in common: a correct diagnosis. Instead they have a plethora of incorrect, often hopeless diagnoses: developmental disability, autism, multiple sclerosis, psychosis, senile dementia, transient ischemic attacks, depression or diabetic neuropathy. But, in reality, they all suffer from the same medical condition: vitamin B12 deficiency.